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Ụkpụrụ ndụ na-agbanwe agbanwe

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Ụkpụrụ Ndụ Consistent Life bụ ụkpụrụ n'azụ ọrụ ikike mmadụ anyị.  

 

Na nkenke, ọ na-ekwusi ike na uru anyị bara dị ka ụmụ mmadụ bụ ihe dị mkpa - kama ịbụ ndị ihe ndị dịpụrụ adịpụ dị ka ikike, ọkwa mmepe, ịdabere, ikpe ọmụma, ma ọ bụ ihe ọ bụla ọzọ. Ọ na-ewepụ ndịiche aka ike sitere n'akụkụ dị iche iche nke ndọrọ ndọrọ ọchịchị wepụta ma kwuo naanị: iji kwesị ekwesị maka ikike mmadụ, o zuola na ị bụ mmadụ.

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torn-paper-top.png

Ụkpụrụ Ndụ Consistent Life bụ ụkpụrụ n'azụ ọrụ ikike mmadụ anyị.  

 

Na nkenke, ọ na-ekwusi ike na uru anyị bara dị ka ụmụ mmadụ bụ ihe dị mkpa - kama ịbụ ndị ihe ndị dịpụrụ adịpụ dị ka ikike, ọkwa mmepe, ịdabere, ikpe ọmụma, ma ọ bụ ihe ọ bụla ọzọ. Ọ na-ewepụ ndịiche aka ike sitere n'akụkụ dị iche iche nke ndọrọ ndọrọ ọchịchị wepụta ma kwuo naanị: iji kwesị ekwesị maka ikike mmadụ, o zuola na ị bụ mmadụ.

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"The development of a human begins with fertilization, a process by which the spermatozoon from the male and the oocyte from the female unite to give rise to a new organism, the zygote."

"Human development begins at fertilization when a sperm fuses with an oocyte to form a single cell, the zygote. This highly specialized, totipotent cell marks the beginning of each of us as a unique individual."

More citations can be accessed here.

Click here to hear from certified OB/GYNs and former abortion providers.

torn-paper-top.png
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Ụkpụrụ Ndụ Consistent Life bụ ụkpụrụ n'azụ ọrụ ikike mmadụ anyị.  

 

Na nkenke, ọ na-ekwusi ike na uru anyị bara dị ka ụmụ mmadụ bụ ihe dị mkpa - kama ịbụ ndị ihe ndị dịpụrụ adịpụ dị ka ikike, ọkwa mmepe, ịdabere, ikpe ọmụma, ma ọ bụ ihe ọ bụla ọzọ. Ọ na-ewepụ ndịiche aka ike sitere n'akụkụ dị iche iche nke ndọrọ ndọrọ ọchịchị wepụta ma kwuo naanị: iji kwesị ekwesị maka ikike mmadụ, o zuola na ị bụ mmadụ.

torn-paper-bottom.png
torn-paper-top.png

Ụkpụrụ Ndụ Consistent Life bụ ụkpụrụ n'azụ ọrụ ikike mmadụ anyị.  

 

Na nkenke, ọ na-ekwusi ike na uru anyị bara dị ka ụmụ mmadụ bụ ihe dị mkpa - kama ịbụ ndị ihe ndị dịpụrụ adịpụ dị ka ikike, ọkwa mmepe, ịdabere, ikpe ọmụma, ma ọ bụ ihe ọ bụla ọzọ. Ọ na-ewepụ ndịiche aka ike sitere n'akụkụ dị iche iche nke ndọrọ ndọrọ ọchịchị wepụta ma kwuo naanị: iji kwesị ekwesị maka ikike mmadụ, o zuola na ị bụ mmadụ.

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torn-paper-bottom.png
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Ụkpụrụ Ndụ Consistent Life bụ ụkpụrụ n'azụ ọrụ ikike mmadụ anyị.  

 

Na nkenke, ọ na-ekwusi ike na uru anyị bara dị ka ụmụ mmadụ bụ ihe dị mkpa - kama ịbụ ndị ihe ndị dịpụrụ adịpụ dị ka ikike, ọkwa mmepe, ịdabere, ikpe ọmụma, ma ọ bụ ihe ọ bụla ọzọ. Ọ na-ewepụ ndịiche aka ike sitere n'akụkụ dị iche iche nke ndọrọ ndọrọ ọchịchị wepụta ma kwuo naanị: iji kwesị ekwesị maka ikike mmadụ, o zuola na ị bụ mmadụ.

torn-paper-bottom.png
torn-paper-top.png

Ụkpụrụ Ndụ Consistent Life bụ ụkpụrụ n'azụ ọrụ ikike mmadụ anyị.  

 

Na nkenke, ọ na-ekwusi ike na uru anyị bara dị ka ụmụ mmadụ bụ ihe dị mkpa - kama ịbụ ndị ihe ndị dịpụrụ adịpụ dị ka ikike, ọkwa mmepe, ịdabere, ikpe ọmụma, ma ọ bụ ihe ọ bụla ọzọ. Ọ na-ewepụ ndịiche aka ike sitere n'akụkụ dị iche iche nke ndọrọ ndọrọ ọchịchị wepụta ma kwuo naanị: iji kwesị ekwesị maka ikike mmadụ, o zuola na ị bụ mmadụ.

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  • Citations
    Note: the terms "zygote," "embryo," and "fetus" are all references to stages of development — just like the words "infant," "adolescent," and "adult." Calling someone an adult doesn't negate the fact that they are a human being. Similarly, referring to children in the womb by their stage in development doesn't negate their humanity, either. "Human development begins at fertilization when a sperm fuses with an oocyte to form a single cell, the zygote. This highly specialized, totipotent cell marks the beginning of each of us as a unique individual." [Moore, Persaud, Torchia. The Developing Human: Clinically Oriented Embryology, 10th edition. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier, 2016, p. 11.] "Almost all higher animals start their lives from a single cell, the fertilized ovum (zygote)... The time of fertilization represents the starting point in the life history, or ontogeny, of the individual." [Carlson, Bruce M. Patten's Foundations of Embryology. 6th edition. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1996, p. 3] "Development of the embryo begins at Stage 1 when a sperm fertilizes an oocyte and together they form a zygote." [England, Marjorie A. Life Before Birth. 2nd ed. England: Mosby-Wolfe, 1996, p.31] "Human development begins after the union of male and female gametes or germ cells during a process known as fertilization (conception). "Fertilization is a sequence of events that begins with the contact of a sperm (spermatozoon) with a secondary oocyte (ovum) and ends with the fusion of their pronuclei (the haploid nuclei of the sperm and ovum) and the mingling of their chromosomes to form a new cell. This fertilized ovum, known as a zygote, is a large diploid cell that is the beginning, or primordium, of a human being." [Moore, Keith L. Essentials of Human Embryology. Toronto: B.C. Decker Inc, 1988, p.2] "Embryo: the developing organism from the time of fertilization until significant differentiation has occurred, when the organism becomes known as a fetus." [Cloning Human Beings. Report and Recommendations of the National Bioethics Advisory Commission. Rockville, MD: GPO, 1997, Appendix-2.] "Embryo: An organism in the earliest stage of development; in a man, from the time of conception to the end of the second month in the uterus." [Dox, Ida G. et al. The Harper Collins Illustrated Medical Dictionary. New York: Harper Perennial, 1993, p. 146] "Embryo: The early developing fertilized egg that is growing into another individual of the species. In man the term 'embryo' is usually restricted to the period of development from fertilization until the end of the eighth week of pregnancy." [Walters, William and Singer, Peter (eds.). Test-Tube Babies. Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 1982, p. 160] "The development of a human being begins with fertilization, a process by which two highly specialized cells, the spermatozoon from the male and the oocyte from the female, unite to give rise to a new organism, the zygote." [Langman, Jan. Medical Embryology. 3rd edition. Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins, 1975, p. 3] "Embryo: The developing individual between the union of the germ cells and the completion of the organs which characterize its body when it becomes a separate organism.... At the moment the sperm cell of the human male meets the ovum of the female and the union results in a fertilized ovum (zygote), a new life has begun.... The term embryo covers the several stages of early development from conception to the ninth or tenth week of life." [Considine, Douglas (ed.). Van Nostrand's Scientific Encyclopedia. 5th edition. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, 1976, p. 943] "I would say that among most scientists, the word 'embryo' includes the time from after fertilization..." [Dr. John Eppig, Senior Staff Scientist, Jackson Laboratory (Bar Harbor, Maine) and Member of the NIH Human Embryo Research Panel -- Panel Transcript, February 2, 1994, p. 31] "The development of a human begins with fertilization, a process by which the spermatozoon from the male and the oocyte from the female unite to give rise to a new organism, the zygote." [Sadler, T.W. Langman's Medical Embryology. 7th edition. Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins 1995, p. 3] "The question came up of what is an embryo, when does an embryo exist, when does it occur. I think, as you know, that in development, life is a continuum.... But I think one of the useful definitions that has come out, especially from Germany, has been the stage at which these two nuclei [from sperm and egg] come together and the membranes between the two break down." [Jonathan Van Blerkom of University of Colorado, expert witness on human embryology before the NIH Human Embryo Research Panel -- Panel Transcript, February 2, 1994, p. 63] "Zygote. This cell, formed by the union of an ovum and a sperm (Gr. zyg tos, yoked together), represents the beginning of a human being. The common expression 'fertilized ovum' refers to the zygote." [Moore, Keith L. and Persaud, T.V.N. Before We Are Born: Essentials of Embryology and Birth Defects. 4th edition. Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders Company, 1993, p. 1] "The chromosomes of the oocyte and sperm are...respectively enclosed within female and male pronuclei. These pronuclei fuse with each other to produce the single, diploid, 2N nucleus of the fertilized zygote. This moment of zygote formation may be taken as the beginning or zero time point of embryonic development." [Larsen, William J. Human Embryology. 2nd edition. New York: Churchill Livingstone, 1997, p. 17] "Although life is a continuous process, fertilization is a critical landmark because, under ordinary circumstances, a new, genetically distinct human organism is thereby formed.... The combination of 23 chromosomes present in each pronucleus results in 46 chromosomes in the zygote. Thus the diploid number is restored and the embryonic genome is formed. The embryo now exists as a genetic unity." [O'Rahilly, Ronan and Müller, Fabiola. Human Embryology & Teratology. 2nd edition. New York: Wiley-Liss, 1996, pp. 8, 29. This textbook lists "pre-embryo" among "discarded and replaced terms" in modern embryology, describing it as "ill-defined and inaccurate" (p. 12}]
  • Post-Abortive Resources
    National Helpline for Abortion Recovery: 1-866-482-5433
  • What about pregnancies resulting from rape?
    It is first and foremost imperative that we work to entirely eliminate rape and sexual assault by, among other things, holding perpetrators accountable and supporting those who survive such acts of aggressive violence. The trauma of sexual assault is often profound and long-lasting; survivors deserve the utmost care and compassion. When a child is conceived as a result of rape, it is important to remember that children cannot control the circumstances of their conception. We must take all measures to protect the pregnant person from further trauma without resorting to violently ending the life of this new, innocent human being. A just society does not simply respond to sexual violence with more aggressive violence, but rather, shelters vulnerable people against all such forms of violence. The stories of survivors ought to be at the forefront of the conversation surrounding pregnancies caused by rape. It is not simply a question of whether or not elective abortion should be permissible in such circumstances, but also a question of how we can help pregnant people who have been raped regardless of the accessibility of elective abortion. People with personal experience in these situations can best answer that question. There are numerous such stories available online, but one in particular is that of Rehumanize International founder Aimee Murphy. Aimee was pro-choice prior to her traumatic experience with sexual assault but her perspective was altered by what she went through. After her assault, Aimee was threatened by her attacker to abort or be killed. She explains: "In that moment, I knew something else, too: if I was indeed with child, that preborn human life within me would be worthy of the same protections as me. If I were to be killed, we would both be the victims of the same violence. So what right did I have to inflict the same harm that was being threatened against me upon an innocent human being? How much better would I be than the guy if I chose the path of violence to reach my goals in life?" It is easy for some pro-choice advocates to dismiss stories like Aimee’s by emphasizing the fact that she had the right to make a personal decision — but the reality is that elective abortion kills human beings. It is vital that we find solutions to such tragic events, but we cannot rationalize and excuse aggressive violence against human beings. You can listen to Aimee tell her full story here. An additional survivor story we would like to highlight is that of Serena Dyksen, who underwent an abortion after being sexually assaulted at 13. Her experience led her to create a ministry for other women who have had abortions. You can hear Serena tell her story on our podcast here. We also suggest reading the stories of women who have experienced pregnancy after sexual violence that can be found at www.savethe1.com.
  • What about life-threatening pregnancies?
    Cases in which the life of the pregnant person is at risk (such as ectopic pregnancy) do not fall under the category of elective abortion. In such cases, the child may need to be removed from the womb or the fallopian tube in order to save the life of the pregnant person, and their chance of survival is low to nonexistent as a result. In a crisis, every possible and realistic effort should be made to save the lives of both the pregnant person and the child. These tragedies are not generally and should never be the subjects of abortion laws, which should only restrict elective abortions: abortions performed explicitly to kill the child.
  • What about miscarriages?
    Although the medical term for miscarriage is “spontaneous abortion,” these tragic deaths should not be confused with elective abortions, which are colloquially referred to as “abortion.” In both instances, a child dies and is expelled from the womb; however, miscarriages are natural and outside the control of the pregnant person, while elective abortions are deliberate. The reality of natural death cannot justify aggressive violence. Some children die by chance; none should die by choice.
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